Approaching the Obelisk.

Jefferson Davis Monument

Field review by the editors.

Fairview, Kentucky

The memory of a beloved President lives on forever, such as the revere felt for the first (and only) President of The Confederate States of America, Jefferson Davis. His birthday is celebrated as an official holiday in four states (Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, South Carolina) and several others hold Confederate Memorial Day (as opposed to National Memorial Day) on June 3rd, his birthday, even though officially CMD is the last Monday is April. The Jefferson Davis Highway snakes around the corridors of power in suburban Washington, DC, and sculptures and statues of the man adorn various places from Stone Mountain, Georgia, to the University of Texas in Austin.

Hurrah for Jeff Davis t-shirt.

Every year Jeff Davis's birthday is celebrated at the Jefferson Davis Monument in the quiet, isolated Western Kentucky town of Fairview. He was born in a log cabin in a spot currently occupied by Fairview's post office.

In 2004, when the monument was reopened after five years of renovation, festivities included Night Artillery firing, a Celebration Ball, the annual Miss Confederacy Pageant (and its sister pageants, Wee Miss Confederacy, Little Miss Confederacy, and Junior Miss Confederacy), rifle and artillery salutes to President Davis, and a keynote address by Gary Rope, portraying Robert E. Lee, who said that the monument was "the symbol of a great God-fearing culture." Then, after the monument was officially reopened, there was a battle.

Souvenir bust of Jefferson Davis.

During the closure, more than $3 million was spent to repair the elevator, install a backup generator, and make the monument handicapped accessible.

At 351 feet tall, the Jefferson Davis Monument is the largest unreinforced concrete obelisk in the world, and the fifth tallest monument in the United States. The top four are St. Louis's Gateway Arch, 630 feet tall; San Jacinto (Texas) Monument, 570 feet (built to the peoples who created an independent country -- just like the Confederates); the Washington Monument, 555 feet; and the Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial at Put in Bay, Ohio, which, at 352 feet, nudges its way past the Davis obelisk by a mere 12 inches.

The Davis monument was conceived in 1907, at a reunion of the Orphan's Brigade of the Confederate Army. In 1917, construction began. After a halt during World War I, the obelisk was finally completed in 1924.

Obelisk.

The walls are seven feet thick at the base, two feet thick at the top. The monument features an elevator to an observation room.

The monument also has a visitors center, which "enlightens visitors on the unique history that caused its preservation." The center includes a gift shop featuring Kentucky handcrafts, souvenirs, books and Civil War memorabilia. The controversial Confederate battle flag does not fly over the monument (less incendiary Confederate government flags do), but battle flag souvenir desk sets can be purchased in the gift shop.

When we last visited, the monument was closed, but the gift store was open, and did sell humorous "Forget, Hell" type souvenirs, as well as a book called "Presidents Birthplaces" which included a chapter on Davis (between Lincoln and Andrew Johnson). Our overwhelming memory of the place is the surprise at how big the monument looks as you come upon it, driving down a quiet two-lane road through the middle of nowhere.

Fairview is also home to a "zero mile" marker for the Jefferson Davis Highway. While never officially sanctioned by the U.S. Department of Transportation, and not listed on many maps, the United Daughters of the Confederacy conceived the JDH back in 1913 (one year after the Lincoln Highway was proposed) as a coast-to-coast road through the Southern capitals. Since then, daughters and granddaughters of the Confederacy have created and erected monuments and markers along many parts of the highway. The Fairview route is actually one of several extensions of the highway, running from Kentucky south to Biloxi, Mississippi.

CSA Belt Buckle in the Jeff Davis gift shop

According to some Confederate nationalists, the Jefferson Davis Highway is "the largest monument to an American," covering 3,417 miles and traversing 13 states.

Roadside Presidents
Roadside Presidents App for iPhone. Find this attraction and more: museums, birthplaces, graves of the Chief Execs, first ladies, pets, assassins and wannabes. Prez bios and oddball trivia. Available on the App Store.

Jefferson Davis Monument

Jefferson Davis State Historic Site

Address:
Jefferson Davis Rd, Fairview, KY
Directions:
Jefferson Davis State Historic Site. About eight miles east of Hopkinsville, where Hwy 115 intersects US Hwy 68/Hwy 80 (Jefferson Davis Hwy).
Hours:
May-Nov. 9-5. Obelisk tour by elevator every half hour. (Call to verify)
Phone:
270-889-6100
Admission:
Adults $4.00
RA Rates:
Worth a Detour
Save to My Sights

Nearby Offbeat Places

More Quirky Attractions in Kentucky

Stories, reports and tips on tourist attractions and odd sights in Kentucky.

Explore Thousands of Unique Roadside Landmarks!

Strange and amusing destinations in the US and Canada are our specialty. Start here.
Use RoadsideAmerica.com's Attraction Maps to plan your next road trip.

October 21, 2014

My Sights

Map and Plan Your Own Roadside Adventure

Try My Sights

Roadside America app
Roadside Presidents app

Kentucky Latest Tips and Stories

Latest Visitor Tips

Sight of the Week

Sight of the Week

San Francisco Dungeon, San Francisco, California (Oct 20-26, 2014)

SotW Archive

USA and Canada Tips and Stories

Latest Visitor Tips

Sightings. Arrives without warning. Leaves no burn marks. A free newsletter from RoadsideAmerica.com. Subscribe now!
RoadsideAmerica.com Hotel & Motel Finder

Special online rates for hotels & motels.

Nearby Hotels and Motels, Fairview, Kentucky

Nightly rates found:

Book Online Now